CubicFootGardening.com

Archive for May, 2012

Peppers are In!

We grow bell peppers in our square foot garden and they are maturing very well this year!

We live in the south and the weather has been cooler and wetter than normal. This only happens once in a decade and the plants love it.

Sweet Peppers

A Bell Pepper ready to harvest!

Pepper plants can take the heat but I have found that they grow best in the 75-85 degree F temperature range. When it gets above 95 or so, the plants don’t produce flowers and therefore no peppers. We get a flourish of production in the late spring and then again in the late fall. It usually gets in the mid 90s or so here by now so this has been great!

We plant bell peppers, also known as sweet peppers. My family eats these raw. just cut it open, remove the seeds, rinse, and it is ready to eat.

You too can produce your own food. It is not rocket science. It doesn’t even take very much time. These plants were planted as seedlings and now we get all of the food we want.

          

Information as Food

I saw this video today, a TED talk, with a gentleman who urges us to consider that our bodies need information just the same as the need food. He urges us to consider that we need to feed information nourish us, and that different people need to prepare the information for consumption in different ways.

Go here to see his speech…

Information is cheap now. The availability of information has now exceeded human capability to use it. The internet is a revolution for mankind in that one of the great limitations for the expression of the mind has been removed. Other limitations such as time, nourishment, willpower, and the economic environment to express the capabilities will always be with us. I believe that we are truly at a dawn where the most able minds now have access to the intellectual food that can make the expression of their mental gifts possible. We have just only started seeing the ramifications of this upon the world.

Unleash yourself. Feed yourself fresh food from your garden and fresh information. Keep you body and mind alive.

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Garlic is coming in!

Garlic is one of the easiest plants in the world to grow. Throw it in the ground in the fall, don’t do much, and in the spring, you get garlic everywhere!

Garlic Bulbils on the stalk in the garden

Garlic Bulbils in the Square Foot Garden

The bulbs are planted in the garden pointy side up. A green stalk forms and grows into a small 18inch-ish size plant.

The leaves are edible while it is growing, but you don’t want to harvest too many from any one plant.

The one clove that you plant grows and splits into multiple cloves.

Depending on the type you planted, you may get a hard stalk that grows in the spring and forms a bulbil. This is like a flower but instead of a bloom, you get a whole bunch of little garlic cloves. There is some debate on whether you want these or not. Some people cut the stalk off so that the energy of the plant if focused on growing the cloves/bulb and not the “flower”.  Some argue that the flower should be left and that this will result in better cloves in the ground for next year’s plantings. Both may be right.

The little Garlic Bulbils from the Garlic Flower in the square foot garden

Baby Garlic!

As you can see, the garlic looks good. I am going to leave most of it in the ground until the bottom 4-5 leaves turn brown while the top is still green.

At harvest time, you can dig up your garlic and put it in a dry place with some air circulation. The can be eaten anytime!

 

Garlic before drying in the square foot garden

Garlic Before Drying

 

Garlic is one of the simplist plants to grow, it take very little work, and just about everybody (except vampires of course) loves it.

Have fun in the garden. If you like this sort of thing, subscibe to my email list for a weekly gardening tip at www.cubicfootgardening.com

          

Garlic at Maturity in a Square Foot Garden

The picture below is of a square foot garden planted at the recommended density for Garlic.

9 garlic bulbs per 1 square foot

Densly planted garlic ready to be harvested

The density should be about 9 bulbs per 1 square foot, planted evenly. This gives enough room for each bulb to develop.

The picture shows it looking a bit crowded but actually it is perfect.

If you grow garlic longer, it will form what looks like a bulge in a stem and produce bulbils. I have written on this before

Much of the garlic produced now is done in China. Although there have been many food scandals coming out of China, I don’t know how they grow the garlic and what the spray on it. If it grows in my garden, I know exactly how it was grown!

I recommend that everybody grow and store their own garlic. It is easy to grow, undemanding, it is disease and pest resistant, and delicious.

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What happens when your food blooms?

The artichoke plant is one of the weirdest plants. When it is growing, it funnels all of the water to it’s base. It is a great design for this.

When it grows the artichoke, the one you see in the restaurant or store, it is harvested before it blooms. The flower itself is amazing.

I spotted this blooming artichoke and thought you might want to see it.

The petals open up and look like a Stegasaurus. The blooms erupts from the center and looks like a giant purple sunflower with wispy elements curling in on themselves.

Creation is amazing.

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This is what happens when an Artichoke blooms

An Artichoke in Bloom

          

Small Square Foot Gardens

I recently visited a beautiful site with small square foot gardens.

Small Square Foot Garden

3 foot by 5 foot Square Foot Garden

The gardens were either 4 feet by 4 feet or 3 feet by 5 feet. They are marked off by green string instead of wood like my garden.

Also, notice that the gardens have only a 4-6 inche border. This garden area is raised above a limestone base with probably about 6-12 inches of soil.  If you have read my earlier post on Design Rules for a Square Foot Garden, I recommend 12-18 inches of soil.

Another example fromt he same garden is shown below:

 

Basil Planted in Four Foot by Four Foot Square Foot Garden

Basil Planted in Four Foot by Four Foot Square Foot Garden

 

It is a four by four foot garden planted with Basil. The Basil is planted one per square.

What is the smallest square foot garden you have seen? Send me a picture and I’ll post it!

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Look Who Showed Up

I noticed these little ones at the front door the other day.

Birds nesting on basket on the front door

They were very quite until their mom showed up to feed them. As soon as she left, they would get very quite.

They are in a basket hanging on the front door. Every time you open the door, they swing inside the house.

Momma bird isn’t too happy about it but the babies always seem to return.